Program Descriptions

Live Show: The Sky Tonight 

The Sky Tonight is a live show presented by astronomers from OSU. It is a 30-40 minute planetarium presentation, followed by 15 minutes of Q&A with an expert astronomer. This show covers basic naked-eye astronomy with particular emphasis on the annual motions of the planets and the Sun, the daily motion of the Sun and stars, the orientation of the sky, locations of important points and well-known constellations, the seasons, the appearance of the sky from different locations, current astronomical events, and light pollution in urban areas.

This show is presented at a level appropriate for a general audience. Children are welcome, and the material itself is appropriate for all ages, but the level of discussion will be geared towards an older audience.. Much like many films, young children will likely enjoy the show, but probably won't understand all of it.

Live Show: Voyage Through the Solar System

Voyage Through the Solar System is a live show presented by astronomers from OSU. It is a 30-40 minute planetarium presentation, followed by 15 minutes of Q&A with an expert astronomer. Voyage Through the Solar System takes visitors on a tour of our solar system, stopping by the planets, dwarf planets and the asteroids.

This show is presented at a level appropriate for a general audience. Children are welcome, and the material itself is appropriate for all ages, but the level of discussion is geared towards an older audience. Much like many films, young children will likely enjoy the show, but probably won't understand all of it.

Live Show: Icy Birth, Fiery Death: The Life Cycle of Stars

The Life Cycle of Stars is a live show presented by astronomers from OSU. It is a 45 minute planetarium presentation. The Life Cycle of Stars covers a small amount of basic naked-eye astronomy from the Earth. We then cover many topics including how stars evolve, stars in our night sky that are evolving, what happens to stars like our Sun, how stars much larger than our sun die, light pollution in urban areas, and more.
 
This show is presented at a level appropriate for a general audience. Children are welcome, and the material itself is appropriate for all ages, but some of the material will likely go over the heads of younger audiences-- Much like many films, young children will likely enjoy the show, but probably won't understand all of it. The planetarium shows are not recommended for children ages 3 or 4 and under unless they are comfortable in the dark and can sit quietly for 30-40 minutes.
 

Live Show: Stories in the Sky

Stories in the Sky is a 30 minute live show aimed for young children ages 4-7. We will look at the night sky, use our imagination to see new patterns in the stars, and talk about some of the stories that people have put in the sky. We will travel around the Earth to visit the skies of Greece, Egypt, China, and the Great Plains.

This show is typically offered on occassional Saturday mornings. Note: All children attending these shows MUST be accompanied by a parent or guardian, so when registering through Eventbrite, reserve seats for both children and adults!

 

Fulldome Feature Presentation: Back to the Moon, FOR GOOD

The show opens with the first era of space exploration in the late 1960s and early 1970s. We see what that era of landers and orbiters taught us about our nearest neighbor including the discovery of the Moon’s origin, composition, structure and the accessibility of raw materials on its surface. The Google Lunar XPRIZE is introduced as the largest incentivized competition to date, designed to democratize space and create new opportunities for eventual human and robotic presence on the Moon. We see the engineering and innovation steps taken by the internationally distributed teams competing to land a spacecraft on the Moon and vie for additional prizes. We highlight the human spirit of competition and collaboration as teams take on this audacious challenge. Who will win the $30 million Google Lunar XPRIZE? The audience is taken through a successful launch, landing and lunar surface travel. The show ends with a stunning glimpse of a plausible scenario for our future on the Moon.

Combined with an introduction to whats in our evening sky one of OSU's astronomers will lead a discussion about space exploration after the feature program.

Fulldome Feature Presentation: Chasing the Ghost Particle

Deep in the ice at the heart of Antarctica, IceCube, the biggest and strangest detector in the world waits for mysterious messengers from the cosmos. Scientists are using tiny and elusive particles called neutrinos to explore the most extreme places in the universe. These ghostly neutrinos give us an exclusive way to study powerful cosmic engines like exploding stars and black holes.

In this 30-minute show, stunning simulations of the most energetic places in our universe, and the galaxies around us, are the prelude to a thrilling journey inside IceCube, looking for traces of neutrino collisions in the ice. From one of the most remote locations on Earth to the unexplored regions of the cosmos, Chasing the Ghost Particle: From the South Pole to the Edge of the Universe will take you on a journey you won’t forget.

Combined with an introduction to whats in our evening sky one of OSU's astronomers will lead a discussion about neutrinos and what we can learn from them after the feature program.

Fulldome Feature Presentation: Two Small Pieces of Glass


Two Small Pieces of Glass is a fulldome movie feature following two teenagers as they attend a local star party. They talk with a local astonomer about the history of telescopes, the fascinating things that telescopes have revealed to us about the universe, and discuss how telescopes work and how they are created. The material is presented at a level appropriate for children, but the content and information in the movie are also of interest to adults, so this movie is recommended for a general audience.

Two Small Pieces of Glass is 22 minutes long, and will be followed by 15 minutes of Q&A with an OSU Astronomer.

Fulldome Feature Presentation: Oasis in Space

Oasis in Space is a fulldome movie feature created by Spitz Inc. During this movie, the audience is taken on a voyage across the observable universe, through galaxies, stellar neighborhoods, and to other planets in search of liquid water. As with our live show, this show is at a level appropriate for general audiences, but the information may go over the heads of very young children.

Oasis in Space is 24 minutes long, and will be followed by 15 minutes of Q&A with an OSU Astronomer.

There is more information abut the show available on SpitzInc.
 

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